Law Firms Have to Do Marketing, Too

But how? Law firms (like all of us) make many mistakes in marketing online. Law Crossing posted an article to help law firms in particular to boost their marketing efforts.

  1. Not using the internet to find clients– we should ALL be using the data we have freely at our fingertips!
  2. Not including practice area and location based keywords in target keyword phrases– if someone gets to your site and can’t figure out where you are and what you do in a matter of seconds, they will leave and go somewhere they can.
  3. Not having a Google Plus business page– the easiest way to increase exposure from searches (the searches are being done on Google, so taking advantage of Google SEO opportunities should be self-explanatory).
  4. Not engaging an audience on social media– build engagement with potential clients– a great way to set yourself apart when there are so many options.
  5. Blogging on the wrong topics– give your target audience relevant material, don’t just bombard them with irrelevant content.
  6. Not targeting synonyms and related keyword phrases– use both attorney AND lawyer, singular and plural!
  7. Not creating an AVVO profile– this is a legal directory with high authority in search, great for increasing traffic to your website and linking to specific attorneys.
  8. Not using video in your marketing efforts– they are much more personal than text (and Google owns YouTube, so videos will help your search ranking).

It is not an easy task to have great marketing for a law firm. But, many of these suggestions require a minimal amount of time and can go a long way.

Source: http://www.lawcrossing.com/employers/article/900047254/8-Marketing-Mistakes-Your-Law-Firm-Might-Be-Making/?utm_source=PC&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=t_18092–dt_20160706-cid_34795-Did_100200186-ad_Employer.Mined.Legal.All-logid_14555752

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Who in the Denver legal market has raised salaries?

Since the inception of the new $180k salary scale for associates at Cravath, many firms across the U.S. have matched the scale, including a few in Denver. This puts pressure on others in the Denver market to follow suit, and while a few have, it remains to be seen who else will fall in line.

Thus far, Above the Law posted an article which lists the law firms to date who have adapted this salary scale. In Denver, they include:
Hogan Lovells
Morrison & Foerster
Gibson Dunn
Arnold & Porter
Wilmer Hale
Haynes & Boone
Baker Hostetler

We’ll most likely have updates to this list as this quarter comes to an end and into Q3 & Q4!

Source: http://abovethelaw.com/2016/06/salary-wars-scorecard-which-firms-have-announced-raises/

Talent Retention- It’s Not Just Promotions They Want

Today’s traditional flat organizational structures were set in place to save costs for companies, but research purports that it may actually do the opposite– at up to $25,000 per employee. Because organizational structures have flattened and companies have removed positions to save money, promotion opportunities have decreased over the last ten years, and individuals spend roughly three years longer at each job-level than in 2010, resulting in much turnover.

What can companies do to mitigate this turnover? Encourage employees to move across functions, so that individuals do not feel so stagnant and itching to move. Employers need to simply develop a relationship with their employees and provide an open source of communication for the employee to be able to express his or her desires and how individuals want to continue to grow and improve their skills within the organization. Motivate employees with personal growth, experience, and new skill-learning opportunities to increase their capabilities, so that they can still value and enjoy their career development even if it does not mean being promoted quickly. Steve Bruce, writer for Recruiting Daily Advisor, cites these strategies can decrease turnover by 33%, saving an organization with 10,000 employees $7.5 million per year.

Source: The Vast Majority of Employees Want for Career Opportunities

Your Next Career Move: Big or Small Law Firm?

Working for a small law firms and large law firms each have their positives and negatives, and the decision of which is better for an individual has more to do with personal style than anything.

A Canadian recruiting firm (R.Johnson) outlines some of the benefits and challenges to working in both small and large firms, and some of the major differences lie in:
-the work atmosphere
-levels of competition
-management structure
-room and pace of career advancement
-benefits
-client interaction
-billable hour requirements
-scope
-type of work

Check out the full article on the major differences to consider here.

When you are looking to make the next step in your career as a law firm attorney, it is imperative that you truly do your research and take all of the moving parts into consideration before making the jump one way or the other.

Source: http://rjohnsoncorp.com/a-lawyers-guide-to-working-for-small-vs-large-law-firms-36-tips/

New Strategies to Narrow Big Law Gender Gap

The latest report from the National Association of Women Lawyers came out last week, showing that the gender pay gap among equity partners has widened.

. Some of the key findings include:

-Women equity partnership ranks have barely risen in 10 years.

-Men far outnumber women among lateral equity partners.

-The gender gap in pay for equity partners has widened.

-Women logged more hours but got paid less.

-Among firms that provided data about the gender of the top 10 highest revenue generators, only 12% were women.

Although women are still underrepresented in the executive level of the legal industry, an article in The American Lawyer contends that partners and practice heads are eager to seek out strategies to alleviate this gap. Teams are going to work together in a new strategy, a hackathon– to come up with proposals to “better recruit, advance and retain experienced women in midsized and large law firms”. The top three ideas will be awarded cash prizes by Bloomberg Law, and the winning partners will donate to a nonprofit that advances women in the legal profession.

This is not only important for societal reasons, but relevant for companies to ensure they are attracting more than just a fraction of desired talent.

Source: http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202740896546/Women-in-Big-Law-Are-Losing-Ground?cmp=share_twitter&slreturn=20150930112144

Advocating for Yourself in the Workplace

Outside of hiring and review processes, negotiations between colleagues and bosses still exist, just informally. It is important to be able to advocate for yourself without being deemed as someone who is not a team player. The Harvard Business Review outlines a strategy that you can use to deal with these everyday negotiations. The structure they suggest is to:
recognize, prepare, initiate, and navigate.

  1. Recognize. Negotiation opportunities are not always obvious, but some situations call for it. You also must be careful to pick your battles, though. The decision to recognize when or when not to negotiate should be made with a sense of what end game is in mind.
  2. Prepare. Even with informal negotiations, being prepared is crucial. The more you know about what others have asked for and been granted at work, the more comfortable you’ll feel crafting your own negotiation. Position yourself in a way that highlights your interdependence, and how your work enables your colleague and others to succeed. Make sure you prepare some alternate solutions to be able to present.
  3. Initiate. Be able to shift a normal interaction into a collaborative negotiation without coming across as combative. Make your value visible and try to bring it up organically and be clear.
  4. Navigate. Go into the conversation with an open mind. Be willing to develop a plan that can work for everyone. Use ‘what if’ and circular questions, and mention if-then scenarios. These ensure that the conversation is collaborative, rather than adversarial.

Everyday negotiations tend to pull us out of our comfort zones, but are entirely worth the effort for both the individual and the organization.

Source: https://hbr.org/2015/11/be-your-own-best-advocate?utm_campaign=Socialflow&utm_source=Socialflow&utm_medium=Tweet

The ever-elusive “purple squirrel” in the legal talent search world

“In the world of talent recruiting and human resources, there is a creature known as the purple squirrel, which is the code name for the perfect employee”. In the legal profession, the purple squirrel has the right academic pedigree, work experience, solid book of business, winning track record, works 16 hours a day, 365 days a year, and will accept whatever pay her employer is willing to offer. They are almost as hard to find as the Loch Ness Monster. In an Above the Law article, Shannon Achimalbe contends that going with the next best candidate, someone who is exceptional but imperfect, is truly the better option for employers.

Why would going with a less than ideal candidate be best? It seems counter-intuitive. For one, it takes a significantly longer time to find, and in the meantime, billable hours are lost and other staff has to unwillingly pick up the slack. Furthermore, if attained, the purple squirrel will likely expect to be treated accordingly, meaning expecting to be catered on his every whim, creating tensions with management and colleagues.

Looking for someone exceptional who shows promise and drive that could improve with the right training is prudent. Holding out only for the purple squirrel may not only waste valuable firm time, but has the potential to be a bad investment as well. Law firms should take this into consideration and ensure they are utilizing the most efficient hiring processes possible.

Source: http://abovethelaw.com/2015/09/back-in-the-race-stop-trying-to-hire-the-purple-squirrel/?rf=1